There was a time when I spent hours thinking of clever ways to describe the music of the past year. There's not much need now. A brief description and a video and you can make up your mind whether my taste has soured or not.

So here's what I listened to the most this year, a year that I thought was the best for new music in a long, long time.

Jason Isbell - Southeastern.

This is the sound of a life falling apart and nearly ending and then trying to figure a way back from the darkness. Isbell's disc is by far the album I listened to the most this year. "Traveling Alone" is simply stunning. "Stockholm" isn't exactly subtle, speaking of a man trapped and entranced by his captors, whether people or addictions, looking to go home. "Cover Me Up" is the bluntest of confessions and a statement of resolve. "Elephant" will rip out your heart.

Aoife O'Donovan - Fossils.

Mostly mellow and so entrancing. O'Donovan sings beautifully and plays with great taste, but don't ignore the lyrical depth here. Check out the lyrics on "Beekeeper."

Caitlin Rose - The Stand-In.

This is why algorithms will never replace people. I learned about this album from Barry Friedman at Birdland Records when I walked in there one afternoon and he declared I had to have it. As usual, he was right. Rose moves easily from country rock to lounge crooner with a sexy swagger that's irresistible.

 

Black Lillies - Runaway Freeway Blues.

Last year, it was Shovels and Rope. This year it is the Black Lillies, simply a great alt-country band. Superb stories, the ability to be quiet and rocking. Listen to "The Fall" and try to tell me otherwise.

 

Kim Richey - Thorn in My Heart.

Kim has traveled a lot of ground, geographically and sonically, moving from Nashville to London and back again. This brings her back to the beginnings, the great country songs that got her start in Nashville (we met in the 1990s when she was the centerpiece of a story on songwriters). There's plenty of heartache here and that's mighty fine. Check out the duet with Jason Isbell on "Break Away Speed."

 

Robbie Fulks - Gone Away Backward.

Robbie is in trad country mode here and he pulls it off with deep, reflective grace. He writes about place, about memory, about everyday things. "That's Where I'm From" is brilliant.

 

Bill Callahan - Dream River.

Callahan is best known as Smog. I didn't know him until a PR person sent me this dark, stunning, occasionally baffling album. Think of Leonard Cohen meets Tom Waits. At times, Callahan uses his baritone as much to convey sounds and feelings as he does words. Listen to him sing "barroom, barroom" in "Seagull" or "Beer. Thank you" in the opener, "The Sing."

 

 

Neko Case - The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You.

She started out as an alt country chanteuse and now Case's songs and vocals have become increasingly complex and unpredictable. But this album may also be her most beautiful.

 

Holly Williams - The Highway.

Yes, she has a famous daddy and a famous granddaddy, but this is the third strong solo album from the haunting Holly. She sings of love, of life on the road, and of life's realizations on this quiet, reflective record.

 

Chic Gamine - Closer.

Four women with incredible voices, one percussionist. For the most part, that's it on this album which merges doo wop, soul, and girl group pop. I dare you not to love the title cut.

 

Kelly Willis and Bruce Robison - "Cheater's Game." Robison and Willis, partners in life, finally release a duo disc. Great choice of covers, superb harmonies, rough and smooth.

 

Garland Jeffreys - Truth Serum. Garland, another North Shore Point House Concerts alum, has typically been a slow writer, leaving years between albums, but he has been on a roll. This is another strong effort, typically mixing rock, pop, reggae, and blues along with social commentary.

 

Slaid Cleaves - Still Fighting the War.His best album in a list of good ones, affecting, honest.

 

The Lone Bellow - The Lone Bellow.

I played this once and set it aside only to revisit it months later. This is catchy Americana with stunning harmonies --from a Brooklyn group.

 

Tim Easton - Not Cool.

Easton comes back strong with a retro Sun Records sound.

 

Greg Trooper - Incident on Willow Street.

The man can sing with such emotion. Soulful Americana. He's long been one of my favorite songwriters.

 

 

Views: 630

Comment by Michael Leeman on December 9, 2013 at 3:08pm

Nice list, Jim. And I couldn't agree more with your comments about Jason Isbell. Just a stunningly good record that didn't get nearly enough attention.

Comment by Julie Wenger Watson on December 9, 2013 at 7:15pm

Great list! Thanks for the tips… I'm thinking I want a few of these in my stocking.

Comment by Gena Chereck on December 10, 2013 at 2:18pm

Good stuff. Especially nice to see some Kelly & Bruce love, and that Chic Gamine track is fun. :)

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Created by No Depression Feb 17, 2009 at 9:06pm. Last updated by No Depression Sep 24, 2012.