John Milward
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Kurt Mahoney commented on John Milward's blog post 'Born in Chicago'
"Hey John, Is there somewhere I can get the top two videos on a hard copy? I really detest watching stuff on computer.. Born in Chicago, grew up in Wis-huge Butterfield fan from the age of 10…so hard to find vintage footage! Nice piece.."
Feb 15
Steve Ford commented on John Milward's blog post 'Born in Chicago'
"Great piece, John. Love that Dave Alvin quote: “The future of rock guitar was in ‘East-West." I just finished reading Randy Poe's excellent bio of Duane Allman ('Skydog'). Poe addresses the influence of modal…"
Feb 13
Dave Crotts commented on John Milward's blog post 'Born in Chicago'
"Great write up!  The "Work Song" clip is unreal.  It is a shame that two of the best ever blues guitarists, Bloomfield and Hollywood Fats let drugs take them at an early age."
Feb 7
Douglas Strobel commented on John Milward's blog post 'Born in Chicago'
"The Butterfield Bands first album had the recommendation to "play as loud as possible". East/West is a killer album also...Supersessions Alberts Shuffle is killer and shows that bloomfiled didn't play in "boxes" on the…"
Feb 7
JP Flynn commented on John Milward's blog post 'Born in Chicago'
"God, they were musically light years beyond anyone else in rock back in '66 afaik. Those first 2 PBBB albums were  scary good to this 13 year-old who until then thought the Animals & Yardbirds had nailed it. Bloomfield's…"
Feb 7
A blog post by John Milward was featured

Born in Chicago

James Cotton was playing harmonica with Muddy Waters the first time he saw white faces at Smitty’s Corner. “Muddy thought they were the tax people,” said Cotton. “He owed some taxes, said, ‘Goddamn, they’ve come to get me. That’s got to be them.’ Muddy hid in the office between sets.” Turned out that one of the white guys was Paul Butterfield; before long, Michael Bloomfield also arrived at the clubs on the South Side of Chicago. “Muddy Waters, he was like a god to me,” said Bloomfield, the…See More
Feb 7
John Milward posted a blog post

Born in Chicago

James Cotton was playing harmonica with Muddy Waters the first time he saw white faces at Smitty’s Corner. “Muddy thought they were the tax people,” said Cotton. “He owed some taxes, said, ‘Goddamn, they’ve come to get me. That’s got to be them.’ Muddy hid in the office between sets.” Turned out that one of the white guys was Paul Butterfield; before long, Michael Bloomfield also arrived at the clubs on the South Side of Chicago. “Muddy Waters, he was like a god to me,” said Bloomfield, the…See More
Feb 4
John Milward commented on Gary Burnett's blog post 'In Praise of Women with Guitars'
"I'm proud (and a little bit sheepish) to say that of the 19 portraits Margie Greve did for our book "Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock 'n' Roll (and Rock Saved the Blues)," Bonnie Raitt was the only woman. I was…"
Dec 2, 2013
Bill Myers commented on John Milward's blog post 'Long Live the King'
"Jimmy is out of his league, here. Way out."
Oct 1, 2013
Rocky commented on John Milward's blog post 'Long Live the King'
"All Hail The King of the Blues!"
Sep 20, 2013
BlueRick commented on John Milward's blog post 'Long Live the King'
"The video with BB, Eric , Jimmy, and Buddy is just so fine"
Sep 20, 2013
A blog post by John Milward was featured

Long Live the King

It takes a mighty, mighty man to blow out 88 candles on a birthday cake. That’s as many candles as there are keys on a piano, and 82 more than the strings on a Gibson ES355 electric guitar. But you can be sure that sometime on September 16, 2013, B.B. King will take a deep breath and extinguish the candles that represent a monumental life during which he’s reigned as the King of the Blues.Over the years I’ve spent writing and researching Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ‘n’ Roll (and Rock…See More
Sep 17, 2013
John Milward posted a blog post

Long Live the King

It takes a mighty, mighty man to blow out 88 candles on a birthday cake. That’s as many candles as there are keys on a piano, and 82 more than the strings on a Gibson ES355 electric guitar. But you can be sure that sometime on September 16, 2013, B.B. King will take a deep breath and extinguish the candles that represent a monumental life during which he’s reigned as the King of the Blues.Over the years I’ve spent writing and researching Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped Rock ‘n’ Roll (and Rock…See More
Sep 16, 2013
jcdunton@gmail.com commented on John Milward's blog post '12 Steps With the Drive-By Truckers'
"Not sure I'm qualified to add to the comments as I'm 49! Living in Australia has meant catching DBT once when they toured and also played with Booker T although I have most of their recorded output. Agree with many of the above comments…"
Jun 26, 2011
Jeff Strowe commented on John Milward's blog post '12 Steps With the Drive-By Truckers'
"Seen them 25 times since 2004 and am bummed I'm missing the Asheville shows this weekend, which is only 4 hours away.  They are pretty tough to top."
Jun 24, 2011
Michael DesAulniers commented on John Milward's blog post '12 Steps With the Drive-By Truckers'
"Have loved this band since I first heard them, some 8 years ago, or so. It was in this magazine  that I first heard of them and it was a critical review(don't recall all of it ; something or other about not original and derivative: the…"
Jun 24, 2011

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John Milward's Blog

Born in Chicago

James Cotton was playing harmonica with Muddy Waters the first time he saw white faces at Smitty’s Corner. “Muddy thought they were the tax people,” said Cotton. “He owed some taxes, said, ‘Goddamn, they’ve come to get me. That’s got to be them.’ Muddy hid in the office between sets.” Turned out that one of the white guys was Paul Butterfield; before long, Michael Bloomfield also arrived at the clubs on the South Side of Chicago. “Muddy Waters, he was like a god to me,” said…

Continue

Posted on February 4, 2014 at 12:30pm — 5 Comments

Long Live the King

It takes a mighty, mighty man to blow out 88 candles on a birthday cake. That’s as many candles as there are keys on a piano, and 82 more than the strings on a Gibson ES355 electric guitar. But you can be sure that sometime on September 16, 2013, B.B. King will take a deep breath and extinguish the candles that represent a monumental life during which he’s reigned as the King of the Blues.

Over the years I’ve spent writing and researching Crossroads: How the Blues Shaped…

Continue

Posted on September 16, 2013 at 8:30am — 4 Comments

12 Steps With the Drive-By Truckers

Twelve, that’s the number of times that I’ve seen the Drive-By Truckers in the last seven years, including three rock shows in 2011.  What’s to explain an old guy’s devotion to a hard-touring guitar band with a catalogue of hard-time rock songs?  Here’s twelve reasons:

 

1) On 2004‘sThe Dirty South, the band’s founding singer-guitarists Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley tangled with a talented young gun named Jason Isbell.  At Irving Plaza in NYC, when all three swung…

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Posted on June 18, 2011 at 6:42am — 8 Comments

Fishing Blues

By John Milward

 

Determining who wrote a traditional blues song can be akin to casting a fishing line into very muddy waters.  That’s because in the early decades of the last century, blues was an oral tradition, with songs and lyrics and guitar licks passed from one musician to the next.  As Dave Van Ronk once said, “Theft is the first law of art, and like any group of intelligent musicians, we all lived with our hands in each other’s pockets.”  Added folklorist and…
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Posted on April 22, 2011 at 11:02am

Comment Wall (2 comments)

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At 4:17am on April 27, 2011, Steve Hatch said…

Hi John

 

      As a featured contributor to No Depression, I’m particularly keen on getting your feedback for the following – Please forgive the intrusion if you don’t have the time or inclination to reply.

 

      I’ve posted the following to the No Depression discussion board – you can either respond there or alternatively drop me a line at shatchsurvey1@yahoo.co.uk

 

Thanks very much for your time

Kind regards,

Steve

 

 

 

My name is Steve Hatch and I’m currently conducting research for my Master’s in Songwriting at Bath Spa University in Bath, England (though I happen to be an ex-pat Georgia boy).  I would be extremely grateful if you could find the time to listen to the track (link below) and answer the 2 accompanying questions.  The more detail, the better of course (more to say in my final analysis) – but all feedback will be useful and very much appreciated.

 

Sadly, as this is an academic pursuit, there is a deadline.  Please reply by May 20th if at all possible so that I can have time to chew over your response and include it in my final write-up.

 

            The track: http://soundcloud.com/stevehatch

 

1)     Which artist/band(s) would you say the track is most similar to and why?

 

2)     Which genre(s) would you say the track belongs to and why?

At 7:07am on June 1, 2010, No Depression said…
Hi John - Welcome to the No Depression community! We hope you're finding everything okay. Please let us know if you have any questions or feedback (here are some FAQs in case anything's confusing). Thanks for joining. Cheers!
Kim
 
 
 

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Created by No Depression Feb 17, 2009 at 9:06pm. Last updated by No Depression Sep 24, 2012.